Novel 1984 Analysis Essays

1984 George Orwell Analytical Essay

Robert Sanchez

992542

P.5

Finesse of Emotions

What makes us human? What makes us human is our curiosity and constant evolution. What makes us human is the ability to create social categories and to form opinions. Abstract emotions including love, thought and creativity are what make us human. In 1984, George Orwell uses his dystopia to show that if we were to abolish these abstract emotions we would cease to be human and become the simple primates we once were; surviving for the sake of survival.

Orwell uses Winston and Julia's relationship to show the power of the human emotion of love. Winston is a pessimistic man that has nothing to live for except for life itself, until he meets a love interest; Julia. Orwell narrates "At the sight of the words�I love you�the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor risks suddenly seemed stupid" (91). Winston is completely changed by the simple words "I love you". For a brief second he feels "the desire to stay alive" because he feels love. His whole purpose of survival is changed. Without this incident he would have kept struggling to survive for nothing but survival. In another instance, after Winston is captured and going though mental reconstruction he goes into room 101. Winston screams frantically, "Do it to Julia! Not me! Julia! I don't care what you do to her. Tear her face off, strip her to the bones" (33). Winston is at a physiological point break due to the intense torture to where he will sacrifice his love for survival. Winston says not only to "do it to Julia!", but to "strip he to the bones" so he does not have to go through the intense torture. He exchanges his love and his humanity in order to survive, and therefore ceases being human.

Orwell shows how the limiting of creativity takes away from our humanity. In the golden country Winston is lying down enjoying the ambience. Orwell illustrates, "But by degrees the flood of music drove all speculations out of his mind…he stopped thinking and merely felt" (103). Winston is not accustomed to creativity, such as music. Here he is lying down taking in the warmth of the sun and enjoying music. Humans naturally enjoy the arts, like music; it's what makes us human. That simple act of letting the...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

1984 By George Orwell Essay

1955 words - 8 pages Things to know: 1984 was a book written about life under a totalitarian regime from an average citizen’s point of view. This book envisions the theme of an all knowing government with strong control over its citizens. This book tells the story of Winston Smith, a worker of the Ministry of Truth, who is in charge of editing the truth to fit the government’s policies and claims. It shows the future of a government bleeding with brute force and...

1984, by George Orwell. Essay

1829 words - 7 pages George Orwell's dystopian (a fictional place where people lead dehumanized and fearful lives) vision of the year 1984, as depicted in what many consider to be his greatest novel, has entered the collective consciousness of the English-speaking world more completely than perhaps any other political text, whether fiction or nonfiction. No matter how far our contemporary world may seem from 1984's Oceania, any suggestion of government...

"1984" by George Orwell Analysis

2429 words - 10 pages "1984" by George Orwell AnalysisWhen two claims contradict one another, it is futile and useless in attempting to analogize between the two. George Orwell, the author of the novel 1984, defines doublethink as "the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them." It is the idea of genuinely accepting two conflicting ideas, which eliminates an individual's capacity of being able to...

Symbolism in 1984 by George Orwell

863 words - 3 pages Symbolism in 1984 by George Orwell Symbols are everywhere. Whether it’s the cross of Christianity, or the swastika of the Third Reich, symbols can convey messages of love, or hate, without ever having to say a word. While George Orwell in his masterpiece 1984 does, of course, use words to convey his themes, he also uses symbols. In the novel 1984, symbols are used as a way for Orwell to reinforce his three major themes. One such...

Historical context of 1984-george orwell

2247 words - 9 pages George Orwell’s 1984 is one of the most important pieces of political fiction; it is a timeless political satire that demands to be read to be truly appreciated. Published in 1948, and set 36 years into the future, 1984 eerily depicts where the world is going, where the truth is shunted and lies are promoted by all mainstream media. Perhaps one of the most powerful science fiction novels of the twentieth century, this apocalyptic satire...

Society’s Influence on 1984 and George Orwell

1422 words - 6 pages Society’s Influence on 1984 and George Orwell "To say 'I accept' in an age like our own is to say that you accept concentration-camps, rubber truncheons, Hitler, Stalin, bombs, aeroplanes, tinned food, machine guns, putsches, purges, slogans, Bedaux belts, gas-masks, submarines, spies, provocateurs, press-censorship, secret prisons, aspirins, Hollywood films and political murder" (Bookshelf I). Politics, society, economy, and war...

The Novel 1984 by George Orwell

2462 words - 10 pages Since the beginning of time man has tried to build vast empires to control the globe. Manifest Destiny has been sown into our human nature creating in us the desire to conquer. In the United States, we are accustomed to a safe democratic government where everyone has a voice and freedoms, but what if it all changed? What would it even look like for America to be stripped of all our freedoms, rights, and liberties? We think this is crazy and could...

Sybolism in "1984" by George Orwell

1062 words - 4 pages In 1984, Orwell makes excellent use of symbolism to further enhance the novel's theme and to reveal character. He wrote 1984 as a political message to warn future generations about the dangers of totalitarian societies. He relays this message through various themes and characters, in turn utilizes powerful symbols to give them further significance. His symbolism is very vast but it can be classified into three categories: characters, places and...

The Novel 1984 by George Orwell

1567 words - 6 pages Throughout history there has always been the people who attempt to take power and use that power to control others.  History shows, that certain government’s abuse their power and use it in various ways against their own people.  Both Stalin’s Party and the Party members from nineteen eight four by George Orwell, use their power against the people the govern over.  The novel is similar to Stalin’s Russia because of various factors.  The way they...

Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell (1984)

1090 words - 4 pages Nineteen Eighty Four by George OrwellIn the novel Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell, Orwell has presented us with his view of the future. I believe that Orwell was indeed on the right track concerning political government issues, even if all his predictions for 1984 did not become a complete realisation. I also believe that when George Orwell was writing this novel he did have a concern for the people in the future about the...

An Analysis of George Orwell and 1984

2578 words - 10 pages Through much of his life, Eric Arthur Blair (pen name George Orwell) sought to vilify the mental and emotional oppression he faced early on and breathe life into the specific ramifications entailed within Socialism as a result of the era in which he grew up in. The culminating result of these forces is evident in his last piece of work, 1984, where the very fabric of Socialism had become distorted in favor of a completely dystopian society in...

“1984” is a novel about totalitarianism and the fate of a single man who tried to escape from an overwhelming political regime. The book was written by the British writer and journalist George Orwell in 1948 and had the Soviet Union as a prototype of the social structure described in it.

Events in the book take place in London, a capital of Airstrip One, which is a province of the state of Oceania. The year is 1984, and the world is engaged in an endless omnipresent war. The political regime called Ingsoc (a misspelled abbreviation for English Socialism) constantly seeks out ways to control the minds and private lives of its citizens. The regime is run by the Party, headed by a half mythical Big Brother. The main protagonist of the novel is Winston Smith, an editor in the Ministry of Truth, which is responsible for propaganda. He has doubts about imposed dogmas that are shared by the majority, and at heart, he hates the Party and the Big Brother.

Winston buys a thick notebook where he writes down his thoughts about the reality that surrounds him. In his world, each step of the individual is controlled by the Thought Police, whose main function is to punish people who think differently from what is contained in the official propaganda. Everyone reports on each other, and even children are taught and encouraged to denounce their parents. Winston knows he commits a crime when he denies the Party’s slogan: “War is Peace. Slavery is Freedom. Ignorance is Strength,” but still he writes in his diary: “Down with the Big Brother.”

At work, Winston recalls recent “Two Minutes Hate” periods of time, when all Party members must gather in special rooms where they watch a short film about Emmanuel Goldstein, the former leader of the Party, who betrayed it and organized the underground movement called the Brotherhood. People are obliged to express hatred towards Goldstein’s image on the screen. During one of these periods, Winston fixates on O’Brien—a member of the most powerful Inner Party. For some reason, Winston imagines that O’Brien could be one of the leaders of the Brotherhood. He wants to talk to him, and he even has a dream in which O’Brien’s voice says: “We shall meet at the place where there is no darkness.”

After the Two Minutes Hate, he received a note from a girl named Julia that reads “I love you.” Julia is a member of the Anti-Sex League, so at first, Winston treats her with mistrust, and he even considers her to be a member of the Thought Police. However, she manages to prove to him that she hates the Party too and they start a love affair. It brings Winston to the thought that they are both doomed, because free romantic relationships between a man and a woman are prohibited. Julia is more optimistic about their situation, because she simply lives in the present moment and does not think about the future. They meet in an old second-hand shop in the Prols’ district—a place where people who have not yet joined the Party life. They seem to be more free and light-hearted than the rest of Airstrip’s One population.

Eventually, Winston and Julia get arrested. They are held separately, tortured, and interrogated. Winston is beaten by jailers and he is forced to confess to various crimes, legitimate and fictional. But still, the physical pain is nothing for him compared to the shock that he experiences when he meets O’Brien and finds that he is a loyal servant of the Big Brother. O’Brien uses a special device that causes incredible pain to “re-educate” Winston, make him love the Big Brother and adopt all the Party’s false dogmas. Winston resists and he declares that despite the fact that, under torture, he has betrayed everything he valued and believed in, there is one person that he is still devoted to: Julia. But here, Orwell depicts the Party’s endless possibilities to monitor the thoughts of each citizen in Oceania. The Party knows exactly what Winston fears most, though it is a secret for Winston himself. O’Brien puts a swarm of rats in front of his victim’s face and, driven to panic and horror, Winston finally cries: “Do it to Julia! Do it to Julia! Not me! Julia! I don’t care what you do to her. Tear her face off and strip her to the bones. Not me! Julia! Not me!”

The novel ends with a description of how Winston is sitting in a cafe, drinking gin. Sometimes he meets Julia occasionally, but they dislike each other now because they know that both of them are traitors. Winston looks at the screen, where an announcer gladly informs everyone that Oceania has won the recent war, and he understands that he now loves the Big Brother. The system managed to break and completely remake Winston.

Reference

Orwell, George. 1984. London: Penguin Books Limited, 2005. Print.

Did you like this guide / sample?

Sign up and we’ll send you ebook of 1254 samples like this for free!

  • 80+ essay types
  • 1000+ essay samples
  • Pro writing tips

Related Writing Guides

Writing a Summary Essay

There are two basic types of summaries: a reader summary, that you compose to develop a better understanding of what you have read, or a summary essay, which is written for others and is an overview of an original text. The point of writing a summary ess...

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *